History 2111
Section 15, Tue./Thur., 9:30 AM-10:45 AM, Walker 205
Section 16, Tue./Thur., 11:00 AM-12:15 PM, Walker 205
Section 17, Tue./Thur., 12:30-1:45 PM, Walker 205

Section 18, Mon./Wed., 9:30 AM-10:45 AM, Thomas 100

All material in the links below is required unless expressly noted otherwise.

1. Administrative information, History 2111

You are required, and will be presumed to have read, all of the documents in this subsection carefully and thoroughly by the end of the drop-add period. While having done so is no guarantee of a passing grade, failure to do so may result in missed deadlines, failure to understand course requirements or student responsibilities, failure to complete assignments (including quizzes/exams), and ultimately reduced grades or failing the course.

Syllabus for History 2111 section  15

Syllabus for History 2111 section  16

Syllabus for History 2111 section  17

Syllabus for History 2111 section  18

History 2111 Course overview

Schedule for History 2111 Monday/Wednesday sections

Schedule for History 2111 Tuesday/Thursday sections

Things to understand about taking a college history course

Ten Study Methods that Work

Guides on How to Study

How to Study in College

How and Why to Take Notes in College

How to Tell if You’re at High Risk for Getting an F in One of Dr. Melton’s Courses

Student grade sheet--use this to track your current course average

 

2. Exam Information, History 2111

You are required, and will be presumed to have read, all of the documents in this subsection carefully and thoroughly by at least three weeks before the scheduled date of the mid-term exam. While having done so is no guarantee of a passing grade, failure to do so may result in reduced grades or failing the course. You are also strongly encouraged to write practice answers to all of the possible questions appearing in the Course Outline. Many students choose to have classmates grade their practice answers in exchange for grading one or more of their classmates' practice answers, and I highly recommend that you do so.

Instructions for Taking the Mid-Term Exam

This is a Bluebook. You can buy one at the school bookstore.

Guide for preparing for an essay/short answer exam

Sample essay/short answer exam

Sample essay answers

Sample answers to a short answer question

Exam Instruction Display (This will be displayed in class just before the exam.)

Post-Exam Review Information

3. Substantive Material, History 2111

Course outline

Course outline, MS Word format (best viewed in outline mode)

Textbooks (see syllabus for statement on textbooks. These are here if you need them, so please don't tell me that you didn't have enough information to answer the exam questions.)

  1.  Textbook: Catherine Locks et al., History in the Making: A History of the People of the United States of America to 1877

  2. Textbook: Wikibooks, U.S. History (edited)

  3. Online optional textbook: The American Yawp 

  4. Map: Medieval Europe

  5. Feudalism 

  6. Viking expansion

  7. The caravel

  8. Map: Trade Routes and the Age of Exploration

  9. Additional Map: The Age of Exploration (emphasis on maritime activity)

  10. Materials on the Age of Exploration and the Columbian Exchange

  11. Balboa's discovery of the Pacific, 1513

  12. Magellan's voyage, 1519-22

  13. De Soto's exploration of North America, 1539-43

  14. Europe in the 1500s: Catholicism vs. Protestantism

  15. The Spanish Armada, 1588

  16. Map: Tribal and European Settlement Patterns

  17. The Mayflower Compact

  18. Individualism versus Collectivism: A Chart

  19. The Fall Line

  20. The Fall Line (additional map)

  21. Economic diversity in the English colonies of North America

  22. Ethnic diversity in the English colonies of North America

  23. A Basic Chart of Colonial Government (Royal Colony)

  24. Protectionism versus Free Trade: A Chart

  25. Nationalism versus Internationalism: A Chart

  26. Eastern North America: Major Geographic Features

  27. The Mississippi River Valley

  28. Map: The French and Indian War

  29. Continental Powers versus Maritime Powers: A General Comparison

  30. North America in 1763 (Map)

  31. British North America, 1763-1775 (Map)

  32. John Adams on the Nature of the American Revolution

  33. Edmund Burke, Speech in Parliament on Conciliation with the Colonies

  34. The Declaration of Independence

  35. Maps: The American War of Independence

  36. Main map

  37. Northern phase: New York and New Jersey

  38. Middle Phase

  39. Hudson River Valley/Burgoyne's Campaign

  40. Southern Phase

  41. Yorktown

  42. The Treaty of Paris of 1783 (map)

  43. The Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution: Keeping Them Straight

  44. The Constitution of the United States

  45.  Constitution with Links

  46. Bill of Rights

  47. Eleventh and Later Amendments

  48. The United States in 1789

  49. A Basic Chart of American Constitutional Government

  50. Three Different Meanings of the Word "Federalist": A Chart

  51. Federalists versus Republicans: The Basics

  52. Nationalism versus Internationalism: A Chart

  53. Individualism versus Collectivism: A Chart

  54. Jay's Treaty, 1794

  55. Pinckney's Treaty, 1795

  56. Washington's Farewell Address (edited)

  57. How the Electoral College Works: A Step-by-Step Guide

  58. The Barbary Wars

  59. The Louisiana Purchase: Jefferson on France in Louisiana

  60. Toussaint L'Ouverture

  61. The Louisiana Purchase, 1803 (Map)

  62. The War of 1812

  63. Andrew Jackson

  64. Andrew Jackson 2

  65. Andrew Jackson 3 (age 14)

  66. Jackson at The Battle of New Orleans

  67. Adjusting the borders after the War of 1812

  68. North and Central America after the The Adams-Onís Treaty, 1819

  69. American Continental Expansion over time (gif)

  70. American Continental Expansion (map)

  71. American Continental Expansion, 1789-1850

  72. The Missouri Compromise, 1820-21

  73. The Amendment Process

  74. The Nullification Crisis, 1828-1833

  75. The Trail of Tears

  76. The Trail of Tears (map 2)

  77. The Cotton Gin

  78. The Old South: The Cotton Kingdom

  79. Value of Southern Cotton, 1800-1860

  80. William Lloyd Garrison

  81. The Liberator

  82. The Texas Revolution, 1836

  83. Oregon, 1846

  84. The Texas Border and Disputed Area, 1846

  85. Mexican War Map

  86. The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo: The Mexican Cession 

  87. The Compromise of 1850: U.S. in 1849

  88. The Compromise of 1850: Proposed changes (compare to previous)

  89. The Compromise of 1850: Major provisions

  90. Stephen A. Douglas

  91. Uncle Tom's Cabin

  92. Map: The Kansas-Nebraska Act

  93. John Brown

  94. Dred Scott

  95. Abraham Lincoln

  96. South Carolina secedes, December 1860

  97. Harpers Ferry, Virginia

  98. John Brown on the way to his execution

  99. The Election of 1860

  100. Secession over time (gif)

  101. Lincoln's First Inaugural Address, March 1861 (required)

  102. "All we ask is to be let alone": Jefferson Davis's Message to the Confederate Congress, 29 April 1861 (optional)

  103. Map of Charleston Harbor

  104. 1776 and 1861

  105. Cotton and slaves and . . .

  106. The Anaconda Plan

  107. Chart: Major Civil War Battles

  108. Map: The Civil War

  109. Map: Civil War, Eastern Theater

  110. George B. McClellan

  111. Map: The Peninsula Campaign, 1862

  112. Robert E. Lee

  113. Lee declines command of the U.S. Army, 1861

  114. Map: Civil War, Western Theater

  115. Map: Civil War, Western Theater (Map 2)

  116. Ulysses S. Grant

  117. The last meeting of Lee and Stonewall Jackson

  118. Vicksburg

  119. The Overland Campaign, 1864

  120. William T. Sherman

  121. The Atlanta Campaign

  122. The March to the Sea

  123. Petersburg

  124. The surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

History 2112
Section 09, Mon./Wed., 9:30 AM-12:45 AM, Thomas 100

All material in the links below is required unless expressly noted otherwise.

1. Administrative information, History 2112

You are required, and will be presumed to have read, all of the documents in this subsection carefully and thoroughly by the end of the drop-add period. While having done so is no guarantee of a passing grade, failure to do so may result in missed deadlines, failure to understand course requirements or student responsibilities, failure to complete assignments (including quizzes/exams), and ultimately reduced grades or failing the course.

Syllabus for History 2112 section 09

History 2112 Course overview

Schedule for History 2112 Monday/Wednesday sections

Schedule for History 2112 Tuesday/Thursday sections

Things to understand about taking a college history course

Ten Study Methods that Work

Guides on How to Study

How to Study in College

How and Why to Take Notes in College

How to Tell if You’re at High Risk for Getting an F in One of Dr. Melton’s Courses

Student grade sheet--use this to track your current course average

2. Exam Information, History 2112

You are required, and will be presumed to have read, all of the documents in this subsection carefully and thoroughly by at least three weeks before the scheduled date of the mid-term exam. While having done so is no guarantee of a passing grade, failure to do so may result in reduced grades or failing the course. You are also strongly encouraged to write practice answers to all of the possible questions appearing in the Course Outline. Many students choose to have classmates grade their practice answers in exchange for grading one or more of their classmates' practice answers, and I highly recommend that you do so.

Instructions for Taking the Mid-Term Exam

This is a Bluebook. You can buy one at the school bookstore.

Guide for preparing for an essay/short answer exam

Sample essay/short answer exam

Sample essay answers

Sample answers to a short answer question

Exam Instruction Display (This will be displayed in class just before the exam.)

Post-Exam Review Information

3. Substantive Material, History 2112

Course outline

Course outline, MS Word format (best viewed in outline mode)

Textbooks (see syllabus for statement on textbooks. These are here if you need them, so please don't tell me that you didn't have enough information to answer the exam questions.)

  1. Textbook: Outline of U.S. History (edited)

  2. Textbook: Wikibooks, U.S. History (edited)

  3. Online optional textbook: The American Yawp 

  4.  

  5. A Basic Chart of American Constitutional Government

  6. Secession, War, and Reconstruction over time (gif)

  7. The Constitution of the United States

  8.  Constitution with Links

  9. Bill of Rights

  10. Eleventh and Later Amendments

  11. The Amendment Process

  12. Pullman sleeping car

  13. Pullman dining car

  14. The Gilded Age: Railroad Growth, 1860-1900

  15. The Transcontinental Railroad

  16. Andrew Carnegie

  17. John D. Rockefeller

  18. John D. Rockefeller

  19. Individualism versus Collectivism: A Chart

  20. The Great Railroad Strike of 1877: Pittsburgh trains burning

  21. The Haymarket Riot, 1886

  22. William Graham Sumner

  23. Protectionism versus Free Trade: A Chart

  24. Continental Powers versus Maritime Powers: A General Comparison

  25. Nationalism versus Internationalism: A Chart

  26. American Expansion into the Pacific Rim

  27. American Expansion into the Pacific Rim (color version)

  28. An eighteenth century ship of the line

  29. a mid-nineteenth century ship of the line

  30. The modern steel navy after the coming of Mahan: The cruiser Atlanta in 1891

  31. The battleship Maine in early 1898

  32. The battleship Maine later in 1898

  33. The Spanish-American War: The Battle of Manila Bay

  34. The Spanish-American War: The Caribbean

  35. The Spanish-American War: Santiago

  36. The Spanish-American War: Santiago 2

  37. The Spanish-American War: Santiago 3

  38.  

  39. Nationalism versus Internationalism: A Chart

  40. The United States in the Caribbean, 1898-1941 (Map)

  41. Theodore Roosevelt's Big Stick: The U.S. Navy

  42. The Great White Fleet

  43. The Amendment Process

  44. World War I

  45. World War I poetry

  46.  World War I: Trench Warfare (diagram)

  47. Aerial photograph of trench networks on the Western Front

  48. Maps, World War I

  49. The U-boat

  50. The U-boat in action

  51. The Lusitania: The German warning

  52. The Zimmermann telegram's proposal to Mexico

  53. Woodrow Wilson--Messiah?

  54. The Roaring '20s

  55. Flappers in the '20s

  56. Al Jolson, The Jazz Singer

  57. Gatsby

  58. George Gershwin: "Summertime," perf. by Kathleen Battle

  59. Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue (unofficial anthem of NYC)

  60. Art Deco

  61. Eugenics 1

  62. Eugenics 2

  63. The New Klan: 1

  64. The New Klan: 2

  65.  The New Deal

  66. FDR, First Inaugural Address

  67. FDR's first fireside chat

  68. Chart of major New Deal acts/programs/agencies

  69. TVA map

  70. FDR and the Court-packing plan

  71. World War II

  72. The Dictators:

  73. Lenin

  74. Stalin

  75. Mussolini

  76. Hitler

  77. The perfect Aryan male

  78. The perfect Aryan female

  79. Nazi expansion in the 1930s: Hitler's bloodless conquests

  80. The Munich Conference: Neville Chamberlain's announcement

  81. The Maginot Line

  82. Main map, World War II Europe

  83. Main map, World War II, Pacific

  84. Battle maps, World War II, Europe

  85. Battle maps, World War II, Pacific

  86. The Pearl Harbor Raid

  87. The Pearl Harbor Raid: FDR speaks to Congress

  88. The Doolittle Raid, April 1942

  89. The Atomic Bomb

  90. Trumans' Announcement of the Atomic Bomb

  91. The Japanese Surrender, 2 September 1945

  92. The surrender in color

  93. The U.S. at War

  94. American industrial might: "Murderers' Row"

  95. Rosie the Riveter

  96. A Real-life "Rosie"

  97. Another Real-life "Rosie"

  98. Lili Marleen: melancholy German song about a soldier separated from his girlfriend used by Allies to demoralize German forces--compare to "In the Mood" below

  99. "There'll Be Bluebirds Over The White Cliffs of Dover"--melancholy English song written during Battle of Britain, England whistling past the graveyard--compare to "In the Mood" below

  100. The American Century in Music: Glenn Miller, "In the Mood"--US cocky, optimistic, upbeat, confident, certain of not just victory but triumph

  101. "In the Mood"--another version featuring American '40's dancing

  102. The American Century in Music: The Andrews Sisters, "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy"--more upbeat optimism, America is in it to win it

  103. The American Century in Music: Oklahoma! clip 1

  104. The American Century in Music: Oklahoma! clip 2

  105. The American Century in Music: Oklahoma! clip 3 (begin 2:52)

  106. The Diplomacy of World War II, 1941-45

  107. The Grand Alliance

  108. Churchill and Roosevelt at Casablanca, 1943

  109. The Big Three at Tehran, 1943

  110. The Big Three at Yalta, 1945

  111. The Big Three at Potsdam, 1945

  112. Yalta and Potsdam: The Alied occupation zones of Germany

  113. The Cold War

  114. Map: The Cold War

  115. The Day After (1983) (37:00 to 59:00)

  116. Cold War culture: Conelrad.com

  117. The Berlin Airlift

  118. Pacific map

  119. The Korean Conflict

  120. Truman and MacArthur Meet at Wake Island

  121. Nuclear Weapons Development: from fission to fusion

  122. Hiroshima, 1945

  123. Nukemap, Hiroshima-sized fission bomb detonated over Robins AFB (technology developed in 1945)

  124. Castle Bravo, 15 megaton nuclear explosion

  125. Nukemap, Fusion/hydrogen weapon detonated over Robins AFB (technology developed in 1952, 1000 times more powerful than Hiroshima)

  126. Nukemap, massive Soviet fusion weapon surface-burst on Robins AFB with radioactive fallout (~7000 times more powerful than Hiroshima)

  127. Nuclear weapon yield comparison tool

  128. John F. Kennedy, Inaugural Address

  129. The Cuban Missile Crisis

  130. U-2 photograph

  131. Map

  132. Kennedy's television address

  133. The Cold Warrior: Reagan and the Wall

  134. The Great Communicator: Reagan and Gorbachev 1

  135. Reagan and Gorbachev 2

  136. Reagan and Gorbachev 3

  137. Postwar American Society

  138. Levittown

  139. Levittown Advertisement

  140. The electronics revolution

  141. Vacuum tubes: main electronic technology prior to the 1950s (soft drink can is for scale)

  142. Transistors, invented in 1947: Smaller, faster, cooler, tougher than vacuum tubes

  143. Integrated circuit, invented in 1958 and scaled up massively since then: Today one can hold millions of transistors

  144. Television and America's view of itself

  145. Nice, safe domestic life 1: Father Knows Best

  146. Nice, safe domestic life 2: Leave it to Beaver

  147. The Western: America as the Rugged Frontier Individualist

  148. Television and Politics, Act I: The Kennedy-Nixon debates

  149. Commentary on the debates

  150. Rosa Parks 

  151. Television and politics, Act II: The New Left

  152. Vietnam

  153. Pacific map

  154. Map

  155. Vietnam slideshow

  156. The United States in Vietnam: North versus South

  157. Ngô Đình Diệm

  158. Thích Quảng Đức 

  159. Diem in 1963

  160. 1968

  161. Tet: The Eddie Adams photo

  162. Raw footage of execution of Nguyễn Văn Lém

  163. Execution commentary (video)

  164. My Lai

  165. King

  166. The assassination of Robert F. Kennedy (video)

  167. The 1968 Democratic National Convention (video)

  168. Photos, Vietnam: The final years

  169. Apollo 11 saves 1968

  170. Kent State

  171. Kent State (video) (Crosby, Stills, Nash, & Young, Ohio)

  172. Jane Fonda

  173. The Fall of Saigon 1

  174. The Fall of Saigon 2

  175. Watergate

  176. Photo, Watergate

  177. Nixon: "I am not a crook" (video)

  178. Rose Mary Woods and the "Rose Mary stretch"

  179. Rose Mary Woods--another angle

  180. Watergate: A retrospective (video)

Political Science 1101
Section 48, Tue./Thurs., 12:30-1:45 PM, Walker 204

All material in the links below is required unless expressly noted otherwise.

1. Administrative Information, Political Science 1101

You are required, and will be presumed to have read, all of the documents in this subsection carefully and thoroughly by the end of the drop-add period. While having done so is no guarantee of a passing grade, failure to do so may result in missed deadlines, failure to understand course requirements or student responsibilities, failure to complete assignments (including quizzes/exams), and ultimately reduced grades or failing the course.

Syllabus for Political Science 1101 section 48

Schedule for Political Science 1101 M/W sections

Schedule for Political Science 1101 T/Th sections

Things to understand about taking a college political science course

Ten Study Methods that Work

Guides on How to Study

How to Study in College

How and Why to Take Notes in College

How to Tell if You’re at High Risk for Getting an F in One of Dr. Melton’s Courses

Student grade sheet--use this to track your current course average

 www.nationstates.net: In accordance with the syllabus, you must create a nation state and join the indicated region by the end of the second week of class. Ask me for the regional password. You can change regions at this link.

 

2. Exam Information, Political Science 1101

You are required, and will be presumed to have read, all of the documents in this subsection carefully and thoroughly by at least three weeks before the scheduled date of the mid-term exam. While having done so is no guarantee of a passing grade, failure to do so may result in reduced grades or failing the course. You are also strongly encouraged to write practice answers to all of the possible questions appearing in the Course Outline. Many students choose to have classmates grade their practice answers in exchange for grading one or more of their classmates' practice answers, and I highly recommend that you do so.

Instructions for Taking the Mid-Term Exam

This is a Bluebook. You can buy one at the school bookstore.

Guide for preparing for an essay/short answer exam (current link is to History version--useful for Political Science too)

Sample essay/short answer exam

Sample essay answers

Sample answers to a short answer question

Exam Instruction Display (This will be displayed in class just before the exam.)

Post-Exam Review Information

3. Substantive Material, Political Science 1101

Course outline

Course outline, MS Word format (best viewed in outline mode)

Textbook (see syllabus for statement on textbooks. This is here if you need it, so please don't tell me that you didn't have enough information to answer the exam questions.)

Course textbook, for downloading (recommended) or viewing online

 

Government and Politics: Basic Considerations

The Origin of Society and Government: Two Views

Hypothetical Social Contracts

The Mayflower Compact

A Basic Chart of Colonial Government (Royal Colony)

The Declaration of Independence

The Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution: Keeping Them Straight

Three Different Meanings of the Word "Federalist": A Chart

The Constitution of the United States

 Constitution with Links

Bill of Rights

Eleventh and Later Amendments

An Outline of the Constitution

 

A Basic Chart of American Constitutional Government

Types of Government Power in the American Federal System

The Tenth Amendment

The original Gerrymander

An example of a modern-day gerrymandered district (Chicago)

Another example of a modern gerrymandered district (NC)

How Congress Makes  a Law (chart)

Sources of Federal Revenue

Entitlements and Discretionary Spending

GDP and Gross National Debt

U.S. Deficit Spending Since 1900

Protectionism versus Free Trade: A Chart

The Amendment Process

How the Electoral College Works: A Step-by-Step Guide

Nationalism versus Internationalism: A Chart

The War Power Under the Constitution: Legislative vs. Executive

The Federal Courts: Justiciability and Jurisdiction

Marbury v. Madison

Judicial Activism versus Judicial Self-Restraint: A Case Study

The Bill of Rights: An Exercise

The Fourth Amendment at Work

Additional materials on criminal procedure (optional) (shout-out to Lauren)

Due Process: Procedural versus Substantive

Roe v. Wade: Background, Holding, Criticisms, and Ramifications

A Comparison of Dred Scott and Roe v. Wade

Political Ideologies and the Political Spectrum

Individualism versus Collectivism: A Chart

Individualism versus Collectivism: Personal Rights/Liberties

Individualism versus Collectivism: Economic/Property Rights

Another view of Left and Right

 

 

Learning Resources
The information below is provided as a service to students. You are encouraged, but not required, to explore and use the materials in this section. Although you will not be tested on it per se, you may find that it improves your study and test-taking skills, which may result in better comprehension and higher grades.

Student Success Center